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What's under your turntable...?  

This page is a photo gallery of different racking methods being used to support turntables.  Various components are used including the frame structure of the mount, a shelf surface and various footer devices including cones, pucks or heavy rubber feet. 

This page is a work in progress and, as such, is incomplete.  The world of audio racks and platforms is so vast that it would seem unlikely to fairly cover the depth and breadth of it within these pages.  The intent here is to add examples of racking and platform methods as they come to me and as I find them, over time.  The page will grow.  Incidentally, I am looking for as many different examples of racking methods as I can find.  From air suspended, to magnetic levitation, to solid and high mass to solid and damped to frequency tuned racks to energy dissipating light and rigid racks, etc. 

Mounting methods are categorized as follows: 

Floor standing, with or without suspension
wall mounted, with or without suspension
suspended from the ceiling (I have no examples of this)

Additionally, various isolation methods may be employed  in an effort to separate the turntable from its environment as follows:

suspension via springs, elastic belts, tennis balls, opposing  magnets, pneumatics, hydraulics
Active (computer control) or Passive (mechanical control)
resonant energy sinks (example: sand box)
constrained layer shelving
high mass plate shelves such as 3 inch thick granite
cone footers, mounting pucks, roller ball isolators, etc.
rubber feet

 

Isolation Feet and devices

Mod Squad TipToes: tip_toes.jpg (20995 bytes) Solid aluminum.

Vibrapods

 

Aurios: Discontinued

Stillpoints: Cone Feet with internal array of ceramic bearing balls designed to dissipate vibrations coming from above and below.

stillpoints.jpg (19681 bytes) hint: click on thumbnail to view image full size

 

Symposium Rollerblocks (ball bearing in a cup)

These allow horizontal motion while being constrained by the curvature of the cup and gravity.

 

Cone Feet in Carbon Fiber: Black Diamond Racing 2k33dbfe63c4.jpg (181652 bytes)

Cone Feet in Ceramic:  DH Labs (Golden Sound) 

Rubber Feet in various sizes and shapes that isolate/filter vibrations from above and below.

Townshend Seismic Load Cell: Compression spring surrounded by a flexible synthetic rubber jacket with two end plates. This is the building block of their current line of isolation shelves and equipment rack systems.

townshend_seismic_feet.jpg (43682 bytes)

Clearaudio Magix: Magnetic isolation pods. Uses magnetic levitation

 

Isolation Shelves and Platforms

 

To isolate from seismic surface borne vibrations coming up from below the component

Seismic Base for the EMT 930: EMT 930-seismic.jpg (45557 bytes) passive. This type of base has also been constructed for the EMT 927.  EMT owners tend to state that the base is generally useful on light springy floors and does isolate from footfall.  However they will quickly say that there is no other audible benefit.  I think they look really cool.

Ginko Designs: Soft springy squash balls between upper and lower plates. Applications: Hi-Fi

 

Townshend Seismic Sink (discontinued) passive neumatic (air bladder) platform Applications: Hi-Fi.  Comes with bicycle pump to inflate the inner-tubes within.

Townshend Seismic Platform  (a single thin plate supported by 4 Townshend seismic load cells) Applications: Hi-Fi

Halcyonics: Active isolation by piezo-electric acceleration detectors. 8 coaxial integrated sensor/actuator axes.  electro-dynamic actuators Applications: Industrial

Herzan TS series : web: http://www.herzan.com

(no air) sub herz vibration isolation across 6 degrees of freedom

Applications: Industrial

SPM (AFM,STM, NSNOM, etc)
High Precision Metrology
Interferometry
Fluorescence Microscopy
High Resolution Microscopy
Profilometry
In-Vetro Fertilization

 

 

Minus-K: Minus K Technology BM-8 platform shown supporting a Simon York S7 turntable.  This platform boasts passive 1/2 hz vertical and 1/2 hz horizontal vibration isolation. More information at: http://www.minusk.com/

It is worth noting that the Minus-K platforms seem to offer the best performance/price ratio.  Sub-herz performance at a fraction of the cost of its competition.

Applications: Industrial. 

Microscopy (scanning electron microscopes, etc.)
Laser/Optical Systems
Biology/Neuroscience
Vacuum Isolation

We get to try out a Minus-K isolation platform here at The Analog Dept.  Notes and observations:  Link to notes page.

 

Vibraplanes: Sized from massive to light-benchtop  air suspended platforms designed to stabilize electron microscopes and other precision lab gear are recommended highly by certain members of the audio press.  Kinetic systems produces these for several industrial purposes.

Applications:

Atomic Force Microscopes
Microhardness Testers
Profilometers
Balances
Audio Equipment
devices that require physical isolation from their surroundings, etc.

Vibraplanes are available as floor-standing work stations and as benchtop isolation shelves.  The shelves are offered in "passive" or "active" models.  The passive models must have their air pressure manually set and periodically maintained. (with a hand operated bicycle pump) The active models level themselves and are self maintained but require an air compressor as part of that system.

Industrial models considered:

Models 2210 (passive), 2212 (active self leveling) offer vertical isolation as low as 1-1/2 hz. They operate in the vertical only. 
Model 2214 offers isolation in the horizontal as well as vertical. Isolation to 2.1hz vert / 1.8hz horizontal.
Model ELpF active air isolation to vertical (1.75hz) horizontal (2.0hz)
note about the Kinetic systems active models; these do not sense acceleration.  they only maintain level in an active mode

For use in audio systems see http://www.soundsofsilence.com/vibraplane-platform/   Their versions look less industrial and  more appropriate within the context of the home audio system.

  specs.

 

 

Silent Running isoBASE web: http://www.silentrunningaudio.com

VR_isobase_2a.jpg (103026 bytes) VR_isobase_2.jpg (170118 bytes) 

The isoBase is a suspension base.  Photos are not available to show the internals of it.  These isoBases are generally well regarded around the audio community.  And they tend to carry a high price tag.

 

 To dissipate/drain vibration coming from the component above the platform

Neuance Platform shelves by Greater Ranges.  No longer available.  But an underground favorite isolation shelf that did not break the bank

Neuance_Teres_2.jpg (46311 bytes) DSC_4749.JPG (112746 bytes)

 

 

Black Diamond Racing Shelves: Carbon Fiber shelves

Above photo: Chuck Miller's Teres.  The custom TT base is cut from a BDR "The Shelf" and it stands over a Black Diamond Racing "The Shelf". Also employed in this setup are BDR cones and pads.  The exact layer-by-layer build up for a "The Shelf" is considered by BDR to be proprietary and is not revealed.  Btw, BDR themselves did built a Teres using their carbon fiber materials and methodology.  It appeard at one show.  I haven't heard of it since.

Symposium shelves: different densities of structural foam adhered between upper and lower aluminum plates.

UltraPCouplersLG.jpg (149853 bytes)

The denser foam is at the outer layers.  The softer less dense foam is sandwiched in the middle.

 

Bright Star Audio shelves: Various models using Sand, air, constrained layer methods and Sorbothane.

 

 

Floor Standing Racks with seismic isolation capabilities

(click on thumbnail image to view full size image or link to a page that does)

Rockportjpg.jpg (99737 bytes) The stand beneath the Rockport Technologies System III Sirius Turntable.  Floor standing, air suspension actively leveled. Integrated into the turntable support stand. (ed. my personal favorite)  discontinued.

 

Townshend Seismic stands:  Seismic-Isolation-Stand-Townshend-Hi-Fi-rack.jpg (23622 bytes) Townshend-hifi-rack-Seimic-Isolation-Stand-980x360.jpg (49893 bytes)

 

Arcici SR1 Reference Suspense Rack. The component shelves hang from an air-bladder suspension located at the top of the structure.  The system is passive.  Air pressure is maintained using a bicycle pump to keep the bladder inflated.

RefFull.jpg (62444 bytes)

 

Arcici Lead Balloon. 308248-lead_balloon_isolation_stand.jpg (171271 bytes)

Solid Floor Standing Racks

Silent Running Craz Reference isoRack plus  web:http://www.silentrunningaudio.com

CRAZ_8.jpg (13821 bytes) CRAZ-A4.jpg (93015 bytes)CRAZ-Parts-copy.jpg (52598 bytes)  

There is more to these racks than what can be seen from the outside.

Teres Audio Gibraltar stand: certus_460_big.jpg (78388 bytes) Rigid, damped, high mass and beautiful.  Atop the Gibraltar stand is the perfect compliment; the Teres Certus 460 http://www.teresaudio.com

 

High Mass and Rigid.  A Billy Baggs Pro stand (commercial) supports a massive 3 inch thick granite plate which in turn supports a massive non-suspended turntable, a Redpoint Testa Rossa XS.  Note how the Redpoint doesn't use footers of any kind, rather its base and motor pod sit flatly over the granite.  Thanks to Wes Bender for sending in this photo.  The rest of Wes's system pics can be viewed here.

TTstand_1.jpg (42469 bytes) Chuck Millers'  ultra massive DIY floor-standing rack supports a carbon fiber base Teres/Graham 2.2 rig.  Rigid, high mass, Sand damped.

Webmaster's heavy wood floor standing rack supports a refurbished Thorens TD124 sitting in a massive slate plinth. 

tabula_rasa.jpg (115025 bytes) Tabula Rasa.  In very solid Maple.  Photo courtesy of Werner Ogiers.

turn.jpg (81513 bytes) Thorston Loesche's massive Acoustic Solid stand supports a non-suspended Acoustic Solid "Solid One" turntable..  Rigid, high mass. 

ACna_5.jpg (83700 bytes) an attic listening room A stout little hardwood cabinet serves as a rigid floor standing support for a non-suspended Garrard 301.

Lew H.jpg (29220 bytes) Lew Hardy's stand in Black Walnut and Myrtle.  

The top is decoupled with racket balls. (click on thumbnail to view full size image)

JNMANA.jpg (48153 bytes) A DIY Mana type rack (light-rigid) supporting a non-suspended Garrard 401

manareftop.jpg (15502 bytes) A light rigid floor support from Mana (discontinued)

 

Wall Mounted Racks

The most common benefit received when using a wall-mounted platform to support a turntable is relative isolation from floor vibrations..... such as foot fall.  However, if the building construction is light and flexible, there still can be some disturbances that reach the turntable by traveling through the building structure itself. Caution must be taken to avoid placing your TT support in room corners.  Lower frequency acoustic waves tend to collect in room corners and then bombard the tonearm cartridge working there.  

Apollo.jpg (25538 bytes) Apollo Wall Rack (commercial) light rigid

target.jpg (16705 bytes) Target Wall Rack (commercial) light rigid

PS_0804.jpg (68365 bytes)Phonosophie (commercial) light rigid

manarefshelf.jpg (11106 bytes) Mana Wall Rack (commercial) light rigid

three_emts.jpg (71857 bytes) under an EMT a frame for duty in the broadcast studio. Rack mounted with spring suspension.

Diy wall shelf in hardwoods. by Bushman

Frame_1a.jpg (40273 bytes) a rigid DIY wall shelf designed to support high mass loads.

izzyrack.jpg (28479 bytes)Don't be deceived, this one is stout.. a wall rack design by Stephen Robinson.  Link to page.

 

Audible Effects of Mechanical Resonances in Turntables (pdf) (click to open into your Adobe Acrobat Reader)

BBnEB.JPG (38195 bytes)

Lynn Flat copy.JPG (155061 bytes) listening room shape at The Analog Dept.